Global Revolution.

Hello everyone,

The walk is officially over and we are now enjoying a much needed relaxation phase.

Friday, October 28th the “Walk Away From Uranium Mining Towards Aboriginal Sovereignty” a group representing over 7 countries (including Greece, New Zealand, Italy, The US, France, Germany and all parts of Australia) that has spent the last 10 weeks walking over 1200 kilometers from Wiluna to Perth ended by walking from City Farm up to Perth CBD for the CHOGM protest rally.

At the rally there were protest groups representing most of the International delegates and a slew of human rights issues.

Because the two topics of uranium mining and Indigenous Sovereignty are so personal and deeply woven into the way society functions, the walk once again saw a media blackout.

Although 3 reporters were at City Farm interviewing organizers and filming the march it was not mentioned on WA television that evening, although it was shown at great length in other parts of the country.

This kind of selective reporting can actually be seen as something quite positive. It has been interesting to witness that without the help of mainstream media the movement has already been hugely successful in that it has continued to build momentum in all the communities the walk has passed through. If the walk drew such a diverse community and accomplished a feat that is supposed to be impossible, what does that say to the larger audience?

The impossible feat is not in walking through the desert for 10 weeks, but in creating this stable and sustainable community that works as a collective and solves problems as a group support system using logic and communication.

In a way the walk can be seen as the most anarchist, revolutionary act. It is in direct contradiction with the entire way society functions. The peace walk dares to question why it is so normal to fear people rather than trust them, and is proof that we can absolutely have peace and equality when we are willing to question our reactions and challenge ourselves to let go of fear.

If this message of hope, resistance and happiness were to get across to the mainstream then we could potentially have a full blown, world wide revolution on our hands. Not the revolution as imagined in the propaganda of guns and violence, but a rational revolution that begins with open communication.

That is what the so called 1% fear most.

And that is what we have achieved.

Personally, I feel it is clear that living and working in community are more beneficial to human health than living in isolation or with one or two people.

When you live in a diverse community you are forced to face your own prejudices and irrational fears and learn to replace them with increased understanding.

When you can stop judging a person based on ideals from some kind of superficial notion then you can get to know them and start understanding the world from their point of view.

When you can understand the world from the point of view of someone who should be completely different from you then you are better able to understand the whole of humanity.

When you get to this place of compassion and understanding you realize that we are all simply human and all deserve equality. If you realize this and are willing to let go of some selfishness, and make yourself a little more vulnerable — then it’s totally rad and life is beautiful and you get amazing friends for life and the satisfaction of being happy with your actions, your community, and your life.

And you can wake up happy, knowing you are not alone in the struggle and sleep peacefully, knowing you are loved.

There is a great difference between a collective emotional outburst and a Revolution, do not confuse the two.

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